Postal Service Eyes Small Businesses with ‘Every Door’ Deal

It may be struggling in the digital age, but the U.S. Postal Service still has direct mail as a tool for growth, as it pushes a new campaign with rates starting at 14.5 cents-per-piece directed at small businesses.
This month, the Postal Service unveiled a new marketing campaign to promote affordable direct mail and shipping services to small businesses.
Dubbed “Every Door Direct Mail,” the program boasts postal rates starting at 14.5 cents per piece.
It launched last year as a Web-based service – similar to usglobalmail.com – that helps small businesses prospect locally to new and existing customers – without the need for names or addresses. The mailings can be dropped off at a local Post Office.
“We are providing a suite of mailing and shipping services tailored to the needs of small businesses to help them compete for customers and run their operations more efficiently,” said Paul Vogel, president and chief marketing/sales officer, U.S. Postal Service.
Businesses can send fliers, menus, brochures and advertisements using targeted strategies. The Web tool is free, enabling small businesses to map their areas online.
Vogel said that Every Door Direct Mail generated $153 million in revenues for the Postal Service since its launch in April 2011 through December 2011.
John DePaola, president of Long Fence and Home, a family-owned home improvement business serving the Washington region, joined Vogel at a press conference to offer his praise of Every Door.
“This program allows us to deliver our valuable message with pinpoint accuracy to the exact neighborhoods we wish to target for our products and services,” said DePaola. “It provides an efficient way to achieve market coverage by focusing on the key areas where there is a need for home improvements.”
The direct mail program is a bright spot for the otherwise struggling Postal Service, which announced last month the closures or downsizings of 223 mail processing centers and the elimination of up to 35,000 jobs.
Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe has said the service needs to cut $20 billion in annual costs by 2015.

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