Anonabox, the Router Gizmo That Encrypts Internet Activity, has Soared to $400K on Kickstarter

Anonabox, the Router Gizmo That Encrypts Internet Activity, has Soared to $400K on Kickstarter
Anonabox “provides anonymous Internet access and encryption, and helps to bypass censorship in places
where access to the Internet is limited,” says
the project’s Kickstarter webpage.

Imagine a small, plug-and-play device for a router that can provide the user with fully-encrypted activities on the web. It is likely to be compatible with most existing router devices. Users of Netgear routers who are looking to grow their familiarity with the inner workings of the device may want to find the Netgear login instructions here, as well as other useful information.
With the growing menace from cyberthieves, a gizmo that anonymizes the web experience should prove very popular. And that’s the scenario already unfolding on Kickstarter with a creation called the anonabox — “anona” for anonymous.
The anonabox, which hinges on open source software known as Tor, “provides anonymous Internet access and encryption, and helps to bypass censorship in places where access to the Internet is limited,” says the project’s Kickstarter webpage.
Developer August Germar and his team initially requested $7,500, but the anonabox project has skyrocketed in popularity to accrue more than $400,000 in a few days, with more than 6,300 backers.
It requires backers to fork over a mere $51 commitment to get their own device.
Germar’s team was not only thinking of privacy when they drummed up the anonabox. Censorship by foreign governments also played a role in the project’s impetus.

Germar was inspired a few years ago by news stories about the Arab Spring and protesters in Egypt being cut off from Twitter. “We wished we could help somehow,” he writes on Kickstarter.
“In places where the government or private entities may try to control or limit access to the Internet, the Tor network allows access to the full, uncensored Internet, and also access to some parts of the web that are hidden even in uncensored places, like .onion domains,” Germar says.

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